09/14/12

Cape Hatteras National Seashore Night Driving Reopens on September 16

Per the new Off-Road Vehicle Management Plan, night driving routes for ORV use will reopen at midnight on September 16 and remain open through November 15, where no turtle nests remain or to the first posted closure in that route.

222 sea turtle nests were identified on National Seashore beaches during the 2012 nesting season. There are approximately 60 remaining nests to date. Due to this record breaking number, please be mindful of sea turtle nest protection areas in effect and note that closure conditions may change on short notice, to include ORV, pedestrian, and pet entry. Closed areas will be clearly marked with “symbolic fencing” consisting of wooden or carsonite posts, closure signs, string, and black filter fencing.

ORV routes that will be open to night driving on September 16 are as follows: North of Ramp 4, South of Ramp 44, West of Ramp 44, the Pole Road to Hatteras Inlet, and South of Ramp 67.

On November 1, the seasonally closed village beaches of Rodanthe-Waves-Salvo, Avon, and the Ocracoke Day Use Area will reopen to ORV use under terms specified in the new ORV Management Plan for Cape Hatteras National Seashore.

A permit is required for any off-road vehicle use in Cape Hatteras National Seashore. ORV permits can be obtained at any of the three National Park Service permit offices located at Coquina Beach, the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse Visitor Center (Buxton), and the Ocracoke Visitor Center. These offices will be open year-round, seven days a week (except Christmas Day), from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., with expanded hours on weekends and holidays during the summer season. The cost of an annual ORV permit (valid for the calendar year) is $120. The cost for a 7-day ORV permit (valid from the date issued) is $50. You must bring your driver’s license and vehicle registration with you.

For further information, please call (252) 473-2111 ext, 148 or check out the Google Earth map.


08/10/12

Fan Photo Friday

Today we are celebrating ORV access to Cape Point, one of the most treasured locales on the Cape Hatteras National Seashore!

The designated ORV route is currently open from 7am to 9pm daily, starting 0.4 miles north of Ramp 43 to Ramp 44 and south to Cape Point.

Permits are required for ORV access on the beaches of Cape Hatteras National Seashore.


Thank you to Rita Lucas for posting her photo to our Facebook page!


07/17/12

Rip Current Awareness

What are rip currents?
Rip currents are channels of water that develop in an opening in a sand bar. Though relatively narrow near the beach, rip currents can increase to over 50 yards in width as they extend up to 1000 feet offshore. The velocity of the water can be as high as 5 mph.

How to identify rip currents?
Rip currents can be identified before entering the water. Look for an area of murky water due to sediment mixing as the channel opened in the sandbar. If the rip current has lasted a long time, the color of the water will appear darker than the surrounding water because of the channel carved by the flowing water. Rip currents will also move objects and/or foam steadily seaward and will cause a break in the incoming wave pattern.

What to do if caught in a rip current?

* Remain calm. Remember, rip currents can pull a swimmer away from the shore but not under the water.
* Swim parallel to the shore until you break free, then swim diagonally toward the shore. Do not attempt to swim directly back toward the shore
* If you cannot swim out of the current, float until it weakens, then swim diagonally toward the shore.
* Ask for help by waving your hands.

Please keep in mind the following Safety Tips:

* Stay out of the water during dangerous surf conditions.
* Know how to swim. Non-swimmers should not rely on floats, such as boogie boards, while in deep water.
* Always swim near a lifeguard.
* Locate rip currents before entering the water.
* Tune in to NOAA weather radio and monitor websites (National Weather Service, Eastern Dare County, NC) and local media for updated surf conditions during your stay on the Outer Banks.
* Check with the lifeguards about rip currents and other hazardous conditions.
* Do not attempt to rescue someone caught in a rip current. Notify a lifeguard or, if there is no lifeguard, yell directions on how to escape, throw the victim something that floats, and call 911.

This information was provided by the National Park Service. For more information on rip currents, ask a lifeguard or check the website at http://www.ripcurrents.noaa.gov.


06/20/12

Beach Access Legislation Passes in the House of Representatives

With the first day of summer upon us, we were ecstatic to hear that the U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 4094, a bill to restore reasonable access to the Cape Hatteras National Seashore Recreational Area.

The bill, introduced by our Congressman, Walter Jones, was approved yesterday, June 19th, and passed in a 232 to 188 vote. H.R. 4094 was included in a package of bills grouped together under H.R. 2578, known as the Conservation and Economic Growth Act. The bill proposes the reinstatement of the Interim Management Plan that was in place prior to the restrictive consent decree and ORV Rule implemented by the National Park Service.

We can’t get too excited yet because before this can occur, the companion bill in the Senate needs to pass and then President Obama needs to sign it.

The 2008 consent decree imposed rigid and severe beach access restrictions that have hurt the local economy and limited the Superintendent from utilizing an active managment approach that would better help wildlife at the seashore.

Chairman Warren Judge, who testified before a Congressional subcommittee urging the passage of H.R. 4094, stated, “It will provide reasonable recreational access in a way that utilizes science based resource management for shorebirds and turtles.” Judge added, “H.R. 4094 represents a true win-win situation for both people and wildlife.”

A companion bill has been sponsored in the U.S. Senate by Senator Richard Burr and Senator Kay Hagan. Senate bill 2372 will be the subject of a Congressional hearing next week.

We are very grateful to our Congressman, Walter Jones, and all of you who have exerted time and energy to this cause. Thank you!


03/16/12

Picture of the Week

Driving on the beach with a 4-wheel drive off-road vehicle (ORV) is one of the very unique aspects of the Cape Hatteras National Recreational Seashore. Effective March 15, the National Park Service is requiring the purchase of permits to drive on the beach. For information on the permit costs and related park service rules, visit Cape Hatteras Beach Driving Permits.

A Bill has been introduced that would help beach access. If driving on the beach is important to you, YOU can help preserve beach access.

Photo submitted on Facebook by Laura Clawson Kemplin.


02/29/12

Bill Introduced to Help Beach Access at Cape Hatteras

In response to the National Park Service Final Rule that has new restrictions and guidelines for accessing the beaches of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina Congressman Walter B. Jones has introduced H.R. 4094. This legislation would restore reasonable pedestrian and motorized access to the Cape Hatteras National Seashore Recreational Area. The bill would overturn a final rule implemented by the National Park Service (NPS) two weeks ago, as well as the 2008 U.S. District court approved Consent Decree.

If you support this bill H.R. 4094, contact your state representatives and urge them to support it as well. The Cape Hatteras National Seashore belongs to everyone, no matter what state you are in, and your voice matters.

“The federal government needs to remember that Cape Hatteras was established to be a recreational area for the American people,” said Congressman Jones. “But taxpayers can’t recreate without access to the beach. The goal of management ought to be a balanced approach between visitor access and species protection. The Final Rule falls short of that goal. The Interim Strategy comes much closer to hitting the target.”

As part of the Final Rule, beach driving permits are required to drive on the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. For information on the permit costs and related park service rules, visit Cape Hatteras Beach Driving Permits.

H.R. 4094 would reinstitute the Park Service’s 2007 Interim Management Strategy (IMS) to govern visitor access and species protection in the Recreational Area. The Interim Strategy was backed up by a 113-page Biological Opinion issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service which found that it would not jeopardize the species of concern, namely piping plover and sea turtles. H.R. 4094 has been referred to the House Natural Resources Committee for further consideration.


02/1/12

Beach Driving Permits – Costs Announced

The National Park Service has announced that there will be a new permitting process for Off-Road Vehicle (ORV) usage in the Cape Hatteras seashore. This rule is effective February 15, 2012.

Permits can be obtained beginning on February 15 at any of the three NPS ORV permit offices located at Coquina Beach, the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse Visitor Center (Buxton), and the Ocracoke Visitor Center. These offices will be open year-round, seven days a week, except Christmas Day, from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., with expanded hours on weekends and holidays during the summer season.

The cost of an annual permit (valid for the calendar year) is $120. A 7-day ORV permit (valid from the date issued) will cost $50.

In order to provide the public with ample time to obtain a permit, there will be a transition period between February 15 and March 15 before the rule is fully implemented and enforced. The FAQ and map is available on the Seashore’s website.

Visit this quick link to view the map of designated ORV routes: http://www.nps.gov/caha/planyourvisit/upload/2012-CAHA-ORV-Routes-Map-2.pdf


What does this mean for you, our vacation guests?

• To drive an ORV on the beach, a permit will need to be purchased and a 7-minute video will need to be watched at any of the three NPS ORV permit offices located at Coquina Beach, the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse Visitor Center (Buxton), and the Ocracoke Visitor Center

• One permit is necessary per vehicle someone intends to drive on the beach.

• You can purchase a full year permit for $120 (calendar year) or a 7-day permit for $50 (7 days from date of purchase).

• Driving will only be permitted in specified areas, and those areas are subject to closures due to “resource protection” or if the capacity limit for the area has been met. Available ORV Routes are listed on the map here: http://www.nps.gov/caha/planyourvisit/upload/2012-CAHA-ORV-Routes-Map-2.pdf .

• The National Park Service website has been updated with FAQ and map information at http://www.nps.gov/caha


Frequently Asked Questions


Do I need a permit to operate a vehicle off road?

Yes. To obtain an ORV permit, you must complete a short education program, acknowledge in writing that you understand and agree to abide by the rules governing ORV use at the Seashore, and pay the applicable permit fee. Both weekly (7-day, valid from the date of issuance) and annual (calendar year) ORV permits will be available.


Is there a limit to the number of ORV permits available?

No. There will be no limit to the number of permits that the Superintendent could issue. However, use restrictions may limit the number of vehicles on a particular route at one time.
Several of my family members have ORVs that we would like to use on Seashore beaches.


Do we need to get a permit for each vehicle?

Yes. You will need to get a permit for each vehicle that you want to use for driving on designated ORV routes. You must display the proof of permit, in a manner and location specified by the Superintendent, on each vehicle that you operate on designated ORV routes within the Seashore. (The proof of permit may be a color coded windshield sticker, hang tag for the rear-view mirror, or some other indicator provided by NPS.)


Where can I operate my vehicle off road?

Once you obtain an ORV permit, you may operate a vehicle off road only on designated routes. Maps of designated ORV routes will be available in the Office of the Superintendent and on the Seashore Web site. For your convenience, we have copied the ORV route chart below or you can find them here: http://www.nps.gov/caha/planyourvisit/upload/2012-CAHA-ORV-Routes-Map-2.pdf


Does the ORV permit guarantee that all designated ORV routes will be open for me to use?

No. In addition to the referenced seasonal restrictions, ORV routes are subject to temporary resource and safety closures. However, past experience indicates that substantial portions of the beach designated as ORV routes will remain open for ORV use even when other sections are temporarily closed.


Are there any requirements for my vehicle?

Yes. To receive a permit to operate a vehicle on designated ORV routes, your vehicle must:
• Be registered, licensed, and insured for highway use and comply with inspection requirements for the state, country, or province where the vehicle is registered
• Have no more than two axles and be equipped with tires that are listed or approved by the U.S. Department of Transportation as described at: http://www.safercar.gov/Vehicle+Shoppers/Tires/Tires+Rating/Passenger+Vehicles.
• Be equipped with a low-pressure tire gauge, shovel, jack, and jack support board.


Can I drive on designated ORV routes at night?

Yes, but not at all times on all routes.

From November 16 through April 30: ORVs will be allowed on designated ORV routes 24 hours a day, subject to the terms and conditions established under an ORV permit.

From May 1 through September 14: Designated ORV routes in potential sea turtle nesting habitat (ocean intertidal zone, ocean backshore, and dunes) will be closed to ORVs from 9 p.m. until 7 a.m.

From September 15 through November 15: Designated ORV routes in potential sea turtle nesting habitat (ocean intertidal zone, ocean backshore, and dunes) will remain closed to ORVs from 9 p.m. until 7 a.m., however, the Superintendent may reopen portions of designated ORV routes at night if there are no turtle nests remaining. This is a minor change to the dates in the ROD. NPS has decided it will be easier for the public to understand and more convenient to administer if the night-driving dates coincided with some of the seasonal ORV route dates. Therefore, night driving may be allowed beginning on September 15 instead of September 16. Routes that are subject to these night-driving restrictions, as well as routes or portions of routes identified as having no turtle nests remaining, will be shown on maps available in the Office of the Superintendent and on the Seashore Web site.


Is a separate permit required for night driving?

No. It will be covered by the ORV permit required to drive on the designated ORV routes in the Seashore.


I have a family member who is disabled or mobility-impaired. Can I use my ORV to drive that family member to the beach where we are gathering, even if it is not designated as an ORV route?

Yes, if you obtain a special-use permit for that purpose. The special-use permit will allow you to transport mobility-impaired individuals to a predetermined location in a beach area in front of a village that is not otherwise open to ORV use. You will be subject to the terms and conditions set forth in the permit. Additionally, you should keep in mind that with a standard ORV permit you will have access to many miles of beach open to ORVs year-round or seasonally. In those areas, vehicles may simply be parked in the ORV corridor.


Basic Definitions

ORV corridor means the actual physical limits of the designated ORV route in the Seashore. On the landward side, the ORV corridor on Seashore beaches will be marked when possible by posts that are located seaward of the toe of the dune or the vegetation line. On the seaward side, the corridor runs to the water line, which will not be marked by posts unless necessary. Where the ocean beach is at least 30 meters wide above the high tide line, the landward side of the corridor will be posted at least 10 meters seaward of the toe of the dune.

ORV permits: ORV permits are a form of NPS special park use permits, which are issued and administered by the Superintendent and for which the NPS charges a fee to recover its administrative costs.
(i) A permit issued by the Superintendent is required to operate a vehicle on designated ORV routes at the Seashore.
(ii) Operation of a motor vehicle authorized under an ORV permit is limited to those routes designated in the ORV routes chart.
(iii) There is no limit to the number of ORV permits that the Superintendent may issue.
(iv) Annual ORV permits are valid for the calendar year for which they are issued. Seven-day ORV permits are valid from the date of issue.
(v) In order to obtain a permit, an applicant must comply with vehicle and equipment requirements, complete a short education program in a manner and location specified by the Superintendent, acknowledge in writing an understanding of the rules governing ORV use at the Seashore, and pay the permit fee.
(vi) Each permit holder must affix the proof of permit, in a manner and location specified by the Superintendent, to the vehicle covered by the permit for use off-road.

ORV ROUTES:
The following ramps are designated for off-road use to provide access to ocean beaches: 2.5, 4, 23, 25.5, 27, 30, 32.5, 34, 38, 43, 44, 47.5, 49, 55, 59, 59.5, 63, 67, 68, 70, and 72.

Designated ORV routes and ramps are subject to resource, safety, seasonal, and other closures.
Soundside ORV access ramps are described below.

For a village beach to be open to ORV use during the winter season, it must be at least 20 meters (66 feet) wide from the toe of the dune seaward to mean high tide line. Maps showing designated routes and ramps will be available in the Office of the Superintendent and on the Seashore Web site.

BODIE ISLAND–DESIGNATED ROUTES

YEAR ROUND: Ramp 2.5 (0.5 miles south of the southern boundary of Coquina Beach) to 0.2 miles south of ramp 4.

SEASONAL (September 15 to March 14): 0.2 miles south of ramp 4 to the eastern confluence of the Atlantic Ocean and Oregon Inlet.

HATTERAS ISLAND–DESIGNATED ROUTES

YEAR ROUND:
1.5 miles south of ramp 23 to ramp 27.
Ramp 30 to ramp 32.5.

The following soundside ORV access routes from NC Highway 12 to Pamlico Sound between the villages of Salvo and Avon: soundside ramps 46, 48, 52, 53, 54 and the soundside ORV access at Little Kinnakeet.
Ramp 38 to 1.5 miles south of ramp 38.

The following soundside ORV access routes from NC Highway 12 to Pamlico Sound between the villages of Avon and Buxton: soundside ramps 57, 58, 59, and 60.
0.4 miles north of ramp 43 to Cape Point to 0.3 miles west of “the hook.”
Interdunal route from intersection with Lighthouse Road (i.e., ramp 44) to ramp 49, with one spur route from the interdunal route to the ORV route below.
Ramp 47.5 to east Frisco boundary.

A soundside ORV access route from Museum Drive to Pamlico Sound near Coast Guard Station Hatteras Inlet.
Pole Road from Museum Drive to Spur Road to Pamlico Sound, with one spur route, commonly known as Cable Crossing, to Pamlico Sound and four spur routes to the ORV route below.
Ramp 55 southwest along the ocean beach for 1.6 miles, ending at the intersection with the route commonly known as Bone Road.

SEASONAL (November 1 to March 31):
0.1 mile south of Rodanthe Pier to ramp 23.
Ramp 34 to ramp 38 (Avon).
East Frisco boundary to west Frisco boundary (Frisco village beach).
East Hatteras boundary to ramp 55 (Hatteras village beach).

OCRACOKE ISLAND–DESIGNATED ROUTES

YEAR ROUND:
Ramp 59 to ramp 63. After ramp 59.5 is constructed, it will replace ramp 59 for ORV access and the route will be from ramp 59.5 to ramp 63.
Three routes from NC Highway 12 to Pamlico Sound located north of the Pony Pens, commonly known as Prong Road, Barrow Pit Road, and Scrag Cedar Road.
1.0 mile northeast of ramp 67 to 0.5 mile northeast of ramp 68.
A route from NC Highway 12 to Pamlico Sound located near Ocracoke Campground, commonly known as Dump Station Road.
0.4 miles northeast of ramp 70 to Ocracoke inlet.
A route from ramp 72 to a pedestrian trail to Pamlico Sound, commonly known as Shirley’s Lane.

SEASONAL (September 15 to March 14): A seasonal route 0.6 mile south of ramp 72 from the beach route to a pedestrian trail to Pamlico Sound.
A seasonal route at the north end of South Point spit from the beach route to Pamlico Sound.
November 1 to March 31 0.5 mile northeast of ramp 68 to ramp 68 (Ocracoke Campground area).


01/26/12

New Beach Driving Permit Rule for Cape Hatteras National Seashore

The National Park Service has announced that there will be a new permitting process for Off-Road Vehicle (ORV) usage in the Cape Hatteras seashore. They have not yet announced the exact cost of the permits or the definite location of where to obtain a permit. We will post this information for you as soon as it becomes available. This rule is effective February 15, 2012.


What does this mean for you, our vacation guests?

• To drive an ORV on the beach, a permit will need to be purchased and a 7-minute video will need to be watched at a designated visitor center. (Locations of centers are to be announced sometime before Feb. 15)

• One permit is necessary per vehicle someone intends to drive on the beach.

• You can purchase for a full year (calendar year) permit or a week permit. The full year permit cost is estimated between $90-$150. For a week permit (7 days from date of purchase), the cost is estimated between $30-$50. (Exact costs are expected to be announced sometime before Feb. 15)

• Driving will only be permitted in specified areas, and those areas are subject to closures due to “resource protection” or if the capacity limit for the area has been met. Scroll down in this post to see a chart of the available ORV Routes.

• The National Park Service website has NOT yet been updated with any of this information. The new rule and all accompanying information can be found currently on the Federal Register website: https://federalregister.gov/a/2012-1250


Frequently Asked Questions


Do I need a permit to operate a vehicle off road?

Yes. To obtain an ORV permit, you must complete a short education program, acknowledge in writing that you understand and agree to abide by the rules governing ORV use at the Seashore, and pay the applicable permit fee. Both weekly (7-day, valid from the date of issuance) and annual (calendar year) ORV permits will be available.


Is there a limit to the number of ORV permits available?

No. There will be no limit to the number of permits that the Superintendent could issue. However, use restrictions may limit the number of vehicles on a particular route at one time.
Several of my family members have ORVs that we would like to use on Seashore beaches.


Do we need to get a permit for each vehicle?

Yes. You will need to get a permit for each vehicle that you want to use for driving on designated ORV routes. You must display the proof of permit, in a manner and location specified by the Superintendent, on each vehicle that you operate on designated ORV routes within the Seashore. (The proof of permit may be a color coded windshield sticker, hang tag for the rear-view mirror, or some other indicator provided by NPS.)


Where can I operate my vehicle off road?

Once you obtain an ORV permit, you may operate a vehicle off road only on designated routes. Maps of designated ORV routes will be available in the Office of the Superintendent and on the Seashore Web site. For your convenience, we have copied the ORV route chart below or you can find them towards the bottom of this Federal Register web page: https://federalregister.gov/a/2012-1250


Does the ORV permit guarantee that all designated ORV routes will be open for me to use?

No. In addition to the referenced seasonal restrictions, ORV routes are subject to temporary resource and safety closures. However, past experience indicates that substantial portions of the beach designated as ORV routes will remain open for ORV use even when other sections are temporarily closed.


Are there any requirements for my vehicle?

Yes. To receive a permit to operate a vehicle on designated ORV routes, your vehicle must:
• Be registered, licensed, and insured for highway use and comply with inspection requirements for the state, country, or province where the vehicle is registered
• Have no more than two axles and be equipped with tires that are listed or approved by the U.S. Department of Transportation as described at: http://www.safercar.gov/Vehicle+Shoppers/Tires/Tires+Rating/Passenger+Vehicles.
• Be equipped with a low-pressure tire gauge, shovel, jack, and jack support board.


Can I drive on designated ORV routes at night?

Yes, but not at all times on all routes.

From November 16 through April 30: ORVs will be allowed on designated ORV routes 24 hours a day, subject to the terms and conditions established under an ORV permit.

From May 1 through September 14: Designated ORV routes in potential sea turtle nesting habitat (ocean intertidal zone, ocean backshore, and dunes) will be closed to ORVs from 9 p.m. until 7 a.m.

From September 15 through November 15: Designated ORV routes in potential sea turtle nesting habitat (ocean intertidal zone, ocean backshore, and dunes) will remain closed to ORVs from 9 p.m. until 7 a.m., however, the Superintendent may reopen portions of designated ORV routes at night if there are no turtle nests remaining. This is a minor change to the dates in the ROD. NPS has decided it will be easier for the public to understand and more convenient to administer if the night-driving dates coincided with some of the seasonal ORV route dates. Therefore, night driving may be allowed beginning on September 15 instead of September 16. Routes that are subject to these night-driving restrictions, as well as routes or portions of routes identified as having no turtle nests remaining, will be shown on maps available in the Office of the Superintendent and on the Seashore Web site.


Is a separate permit required for night driving?

No. It will be covered by the ORV permit required to drive on the designated ORV routes in the Seashore.


I have a family member who is disabled or mobility-impaired. Can I use my ORV to drive that family member to the beach where we are gathering, even if it is not designated as an ORV route?

Yes, if you obtain a special-use permit for that purpose. The special-use permit will allow you to transport mobility-impaired individuals to a predetermined location in a beach area in front of a village that is not otherwise open to ORV use. You will be subject to the terms and conditions set forth in the permit. Additionally, you should keep in mind that with a standard ORV permit you will have access to many miles of beach open to ORVs year-round or seasonally. In those areas, vehicles may simply be parked in the ORV corridor.


Basic Definitions

ORV corridor means the actual physical limits of the designated ORV route in the Seashore. On the landward side, the ORV corridor on Seashore beaches will be marked when possible by posts that are located seaward of the toe of the dune or the vegetation line. On the seaward side, the corridor runs to the water line, which will not be marked by posts unless necessary. Where the ocean beach is at least 30 meters wide above the high tide line, the landward side of the corridor will be posted at least 10 meters seaward of the toe of the dune.

ORV permits: ORV permits are a form of NPS special park use permits, which are issued and administered by the Superintendent and for which the NPS charges a fee to recover its administrative costs.
(i) A permit issued by the Superintendent is required to operate a vehicle on designated ORV routes at the Seashore.
(ii) Operation of a motor vehicle authorized under an ORV permit is limited to those routes designated in the ORV routes chart.
(iii) There is no limit to the number of ORV permits that the Superintendent may issue.
(iv) Annual ORV permits are valid for the calendar year for which they are issued. Seven-day ORV permits are valid from the date of issue.
(v) In order to obtain a permit, an applicant must comply with vehicle and equipment requirements, complete a short education program in a manner and location specified by the Superintendent, acknowledge in writing an understanding of the rules governing ORV use at the Seashore, and pay the permit fee.
(vi) Each permit holder must affix the proof of permit, in a manner and location specified by the Superintendent, to the vehicle covered by the permit for use off-road.

ORV ROUTES:
The following ramps are designated for off-road use to provide access to ocean beaches: 2.5, 4, 23, 25.5, 27, 30, 32.5, 34, 38, 43, 44, 47.5, 49, 55, 59, 59.5, 63, 67, 68, 70, and 72.

Designated ORV routes and ramps are subject to resource, safety, seasonal, and other closures.
Soundside ORV access ramps are described below.

For a village beach to be open to ORV use during the winter season, it must be at least 20 meters (66 feet) wide from the toe of the dune seaward to mean high tide line. Maps showing designated routes and ramps will be available in the Office of the Superintendent and on the Seashore Web site.

BODIE ISLAND–DESIGNATED ROUTES

YEAR ROUND: Ramp 2.5 (0.5 miles south of the southern boundary of Coquina Beach) to 0.2 miles south of ramp 4.

SEASONAL (September 15 to March 14): 0.2 miles south of ramp 4 to the eastern confluence of the Atlantic Ocean and Oregon Inlet.

HATTERAS ISLAND–DESIGNATED ROUTES

YEAR ROUND:
1.5 miles south of ramp 23 to ramp 27.
Ramp 30 to ramp 32.5.

The following soundside ORV access routes from NC Highway 12 to Pamlico Sound between the villages of Salvo and Avon: soundside ramps 46, 48, 52, 53, 54 and the soundside ORV access at Little Kinnakeet.
Ramp 38 to 1.5 miles south of ramp 38.

The following soundside ORV access routes from NC Highway 12 to Pamlico Sound between the villages of Avon and Buxton: soundside ramps 57, 58, 59, and 60.
0.4 miles north of ramp 43 to Cape Point to 0.3 miles west of “the hook.”
Interdunal route from intersection with Lighthouse Road (i.e., ramp 44) to ramp 49, with one spur route from the interdunal route to the ORV route below.
Ramp 47.5 to east Frisco boundary.

A soundside ORV access route from Museum Drive to Pamlico Sound near Coast Guard Station Hatteras Inlet.
Pole Road from Museum Drive to Spur Road to Pamlico Sound, with one spur route, commonly known as Cable Crossing, to Pamlico Sound and four spur routes to the ORV route below.
Ramp 55 southwest along the ocean beach for 1.6 miles, ending at the intersection with the route commonly known as Bone Road.

SEASONAL (November 1 to March 31):
0.1 mile south of Rodanthe Pier to ramp 23.
Ramp 34 to ramp 38 (Avon).
East Frisco boundary to west Frisco boundary (Frisco village beach).
East Hatteras boundary to ramp 55 (Hatteras village beach).

OCRACOKE ISLAND–DESIGNATED ROUTES

YEAR ROUND:
Ramp 59 to ramp 63. After ramp 59.5 is constructed, it will replace ramp 59 for ORV access and the route will be from ramp 59.5 to ramp 63.
Three routes from NC Highway 12 to Pamlico Sound located north of the Pony Pens, commonly known as Prong Road, Barrow Pit Road, and Scrag Cedar Road.
1.0 mile northeast of ramp 67 to 0.5 mile northeast of ramp 68.
A route from NC Highway 12 to Pamlico Sound located near Ocracoke Campground, commonly known as Dump Station Road.
0.4 miles northeast of ramp 70 to Ocracoke inlet.
A route from ramp 72 to a pedestrian trail to Pamlico Sound, commonly known as Shirley’s Lane.

SEASONAL (September 15 to March 14): A seasonal route 0.6 mile south of ramp 72 from the beach route to a pedestrian trail to Pamlico Sound.
A seasonal route at the north end of South Point spit from the beach route to Pamlico Sound.
November 1 to March 31 0.5 mile northeast of ramp 68 to ramp 68 (Ocracoke Campground area).


01/10/12

“Fee Free” Holiday Weekend at Wright Brothers National Memorial

Wright Brothers National Memorial will be joining national park sites across the country in celebrating the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday by waiving admission fees on Saturday, Sunday and Monday, January 14-16.

Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced that the National Park Service will also waive admission fees on April 21-29 (National Park Week), June 9 (Get Outdoors Day), September 29 (National Public Lands Day), and November 10-12 (Veterans Day weekend). For additional information on national park fee free days, go to www.nps.gov/findapark/feefreeparks.htm.

Park staff of the Outer Banks Group manage the parks for visitors who seek inspiration and rejuvenation from the natural wonders and rich cultural heritage of the area. Bring your family and friends to Wright Brothers National Memorial, the site of the first powered flight, and learn more about this great nation’s aviation history. Enjoy exploring the winter beaches of the nation’s first national seashore, Cape Hatteras National Seashore, and visit the site of the first English settlement at Fort Raleigh National Historic Site.

“Winter can be a wonderful time to visit the national parks of the Outer Banks. During the winter months the smaller crowds, more relaxed pace, and sunny, cool days can provide wonderful opportunities for affordable family vacations close to home,” said Superintendent Mike Murray. “Fee free days are a great opportunity to discover a new season in your favorite national park.”

Entrance fees are not charged at Fort Raleigh National Historic Site or Cape Hatteras National Seashore.

For information on winter hours and available services, please visit the park’s websites at www.nps.gov/wrbr, www.nps.gov/caha, and www.nps.gov/fora, or call 252-473-2111.


11/29/11

Seashell Holiday Crafts – Give A Little Bit Of Hatteras Island This Holiday Season

While basking in the sun and strolling along the shoreline during your Hatteras Island vacation, you are bound to have come across many unique and beautiful seashells. You collected them in buckets, coolers – even pockets – and took them home with you at the end of your stay.

Now what? Since the holiday season is rapidly approaching, (oh who are we kidding – it’s HERE!) why not take some of those treasures you have collected and use them to create one-of-a-kind holiday seashell crafts? They are the perfect way to have a little bit of Hatteras Island for the holidays! They also make wonderful gifts to give to your loved ones. What’s better than receiving something someone else put love and care into?

We have compiled a few simple craft ideas you can try. Don’t limit yourself to just these ideas though. The possibilities are endless!

Holiday Wreath:
What you’ll need: Seashells, wreath, clear nail polish, a glue gun or crazy glue, ribbon, and decorations like bows, ornaments, strings of beads, glitter, etc.
Best shells to use: Whole scallops, clams, and arc shells.
How to do it: Paint all the shells with a heavy coat of clear nail polish so they look like they just washed up from the ocean – or – glue white glitter on them to make it look like sand or snow. Once your shells have dried, place them where you want them on your wreath (available at dollar stores and craft stores). Using a glue gun or crazy glue, glue them to the wreath. Continue gluing bows and/or other decorations you want on the wreath. Once dried, add a hanger or ribbon to hang your pretty creation on a door or wall.

Holiday Ornaments:
What you’ll need: Seashells, clear nail polish, a glue gun or crazy glue, ribbon, and decorations like strings of beads, glitter, etc.
Best shells to use: Whole scallops, clams, moon snails, and arc shells.
How to do it: Paint all the shells with a heavy coat of clear nail polish so they look like they just washed up from the ocean. Once shells are dry, loop a ribbon or string of beads into a circle, and glue it to the back of the shell, creating a “hanger” for the ornament. (If you have two similar shells, you can even glue them together, with the loop of ribbon in between the two shells.) Then decorate each individual shell any way you’d like: add glitter, glue a string of beads along the edge of the shell, or even paint holiday designs on the shell.

Mirrors, Picture Frames, Trinket Boxes:
What you’ll need: Lots of shells, a glue gun or crazy glue, clear nail polish, and a plain mirror, a frame you can decorate, or a trinket box. (You can also get cut pieces of mirror at a hardware store, and simply add a hanger to the back.)
Best shells to use: Small, decorative shells, or pretty shell pieces.
How to do it: Glue the shell pieces around the mirror, overlapping each other so that there are no spaces of mirror visible. Once the glue has dried, coat the shells with nail polish to make them shine.
Have fun and get creative, and don’t forget that these ideas are just the start of the number of projects you can do with your seashells. Grab a little glue, polish and paint – there’s no limit to the number of remarkable, one of a kind craft projects you can create with these treasures.

Wall Hangings:
What you’ll need: A nice thin piece of driftwood, approx. 12″ – 18″ long, seashells, rustic twine, fishing line or strong thread, nails or tacks.
Best shells to use: Small decorative shells with tiny holes in them, large enough to pull thread or fishing line through.
How to do it: Create strings of shells by looping the fishing line or thread through each shell and tying a knot, creating an even 8″ – 12″ long string of a dozen shells or so. If the driftwood is sturdy enough, space tacks or nails along the piece of driftwood and tie on each string of shells. If not, simply tie each string of shells to the piece of driftwood. Essentially, you’re forming a “beaded curtain” of shells along the piece of driftwood. Once this is complete, add hardy twine to each side of the piece of driftwood, or around each of the nails, gathering and tying the individual pieces at the top, and creating a hanger for the wall hanging.

The following craft ideas and pictures are via Better Homes and Gardens:

Beach Detailed Flower Holder:
Repurpose a tin can with beach finds. Gluefabric or paper around the clean can. Add desired beach details. To use on a chair back, cut a hole near the top and the bottom of the back of the can, then tie with ribbon threaded through the holes. Or set decorated tin on the table as a centerpiece.

Shells and Twine Bookmark:
Craft a lovely bookmark to remind you of days at the beach. Natural string fits right in with seashore finds, such as shells, buttons, and bottle caps. Knot eight 18-inch-long strands together at one end to make the main bookmark; knot 8 inches below the first knot, or farther depending on
the size of the book. Drill holes in items to attach to the string ends or use hot glue.

Seashell Candles:
Clean shells and let dry. Melt small chunks of a paraffin block or old candle stubs in the top of a double boiler. Cover the work surface with plastic or newspaper. Slowly and carefully pour melted wax into shells. Quickly put a wick in the center of the wax. Let cool about 30 minutes. Never leave burning candles unattended.

Beach Memory Jars:
Bring home beach memories to store in a jar. Collect clear jars and bottles. Put shells and sand inside. Label each container with rub-ons or stickers to spell out the name of the destination.

Have fun with these projects! Happy Holidays from your friends at Surf or Sound Realty!